Why Black Panther is Important

 I remember sitting in American History class. My high school was predominantly white with maybe 30% or less minority population. I sat next to the only other black person in the classroom.

We flipped through the history book and found the section of African American history. I am not exaggerating, out of a 400-page book, we had one chapter and it was maybe three pages long.

Can you imagine being a young American black girl discovering who you are and trying figure out your place in the world to discover ONLY three pages of people who look like you? 

Society does a great job perpetuating images and standards of beauty many cannot live up to, especially black women. Much of my childhood came with hating the way I looked and wishing I wasn’t black. Feeling cursed because my hair felt different and my skin was too dark.

I used to play pretend with my friends and cousins; we would pretend we were white. White people were beautiful. They were models. They were on the front cover of magazines. They were leading ladies in the movies, especially the romantic ones. They were Disney princesses.

By the way, I was an adult when the first black Disney princess was created. 

I recall a time in high school when a Hispanic boy asked the only two or three black girls in class why black girls didn’t have hair. Too many of us had breakage and short hair because our parents were taught to tame our afros, coils, and curls by putting a chemical in our hair to permanently strengthen it.

I was twenty-four when I discovered the real texture of my hair. Even now, I find myself defending the stigma that my hair is ugly in its natural state. I have to protect the image of my puffy afro from people trying to convince me I am more beautiful when my hair is straight.

So what does all this have to do with a Black superhero from Wakanda? 

Majority of black representation on the big screen is often extreme stereotypes, sometimes perpetuated by our own people. The only “real” black movies with people that look like me were gangster life in the hood or slavery. None of which I could relate to.

But, Black Panther is a superhero. What does that have to do with black culture?

It is the representation that being black can be cool. It is the celebrations of black roots and black culture without being slaves or poor. It is the idea that dark skin is beautiful. That kinky, coily hair is fashionable and attractive.

It is the image of black women being celebrated and regarded as crucial characters in a plot and not the side-kick of the leading white girl or white man. It is dark black skin being the majority in the movie and not just the token black man in a cast to represent “diversity.” 

Many may not comprehend the importance of black culture, our need to be celebrated or our need to be represented, not only in history books but in the media, in cartoons, and in movies.

After all, they were not the young girl questioning her beauty and the worth of her people.

Oh, how that has changed. Now, we are dark-skinned warriors, a part of a rich society the rest of the world does not even compare to. We are superheroes!

 

Ebby LeBlanc

The Real Issue with Beyonce’s Super Bowl Performance

 

It’s Black History Month and I wanted to dedicate posts to black people of the past, who made a difference in American lives: Frederick Douglass, Daniel Hale Williams, Dorothy Dandridge, Sojourner Truth, etc. However, the backlash Beyonce received for her Super Bowl performance has rubbed me in a way that I must speak on it.

I’ve been reluctant to write post about #blacklivesmatters only because people believe what they want to believe regardless of the truth.

I’ve been reluctant to write post about #blacklivesmatters only because people believe what they want to believe regardless of the truth. And, if we are honest, anytime a black person attempts to defend themselves, somehow, people who do not understand and/or refuse to understand are offended.  I live in a country where my skin speaks for me as soon as I walk in a room. And therefore, I left to subconsciously prove that I am not the negative picture America portrays black people to be. You know, an uneducated black single mom cheating the system of welfare. I’m hesitant to use that example due to the harsh criticism black females receive when they are a single mom on welfare, as if they are the only ethnicity who fits this description, which they are not, by the way.

To digress, Beyoncé’s performance at the Super Bowl Halftime show was entertaining. I am proud of her for using her voice and speaking out about what’s going on in the Black community. As always, someone misinterpreted the message.

Her performance and the video Formation were meant to pay homage to the struggles Blacks have endured for years. It was, in all, a tribute to Black History Month and the present state of the Black community.

For one, her performance and the video Formation were meant to pay homage to the struggles Blacks have endured for years. It was, in all, a tribute to Black History Month and the present state of the Black community. How was it twisted into an anti-police statement? I was actually surprised when I heard that; go figure, since nothing should be of surprise these days.

you missed the message if you believe this was police slander.

Yet, you missed the message if you believe this was police slander. Yes, she has a police car sinking in the water; have you already forgotten about Hurricane Katrina?

Yes, Mayor Rudy Giuliani politics and race should not be mixed with American football, but is only acceptable if you are degrading Cam Newton, the Carolina Panther’s Quarterback for nothing other than…being black. That was sarcasm by the way.

Yes, Mayor Rudy Giuliani politics and race should not be mixed with American football, but is only acceptable if you are degrading Cam Newton, the Carolina Panther’s Quarterback for nothing other than…being black. That was sarcasm by the way.

There is a group of white people, not all of course, but there is a group.( By the way, I’m using the term white people purposely to invoke discomfort) I believe this group doesn’t have many black friends

I’ve noticed there is a group of white people, not all of course, but there is a group. (By the way, I’m using the term white people purposely to invoke discomfort). I believe this group doesn’t have many black friends. I’m sorry the token black friend or that one black coworker that you talk to at work every day doesn’t count. I’m talking about a black friend that you know on a deeper, personal level. You know each other’s extended family, you go to each other’s family outings, you have nicknames for one another, and you’ve had heart to heart conversations to know them beyond the outside shell. I believe it is this group of people with no black friends, who are offended when a production is put on with an all-black cast (The Wiz Live). They cry reverse racism because for one night on primetime television white people weren’t included. Never mind all the countless times it is an all-white ensemble cast, because that is always acceptable. Just like the all-white Oscars nominees because it is both okay and common that no other ethnicity was talented enough. We’ve grown accustomed to it, so why question it, right?

These are the people who shout ALL LIVES MATTER missing the key message that #blacklivesmatter is merely proclaiming that we matter too.

These are the people who shout ALL LIVES MATTER missing the key message that #blacklivesmatter is merely proclaiming that we matter too. However, once again the message is ignorantly twisted to the belief of Black superiority. These are the people who get offended when Black History is mentioned; they shout, “get over it, that’s a thing of the past” or that we’re only perpetuating racism by mentioning the racist acts. Oh, the one that I hear the most is that racism ended years ago and the things happening today are just coincidences. All these black men being killed by the police are coincidences? Never mind that when a young black man commits a crime he is thug, but when a young white man of the same age commits a crime, he has a broken home or some type of mental instability.

 The fact of the matter is the only thing wrong with blacks speaking openly about racism is that with new advancements in video recordings, you can no longer deny it is happening. So now, you must justify it with “he was a thug, or she shouldn’t have been mouthing off, as if words should be punishable by death.

 The real truth: you want blacks to stop mentioning racism because it makes YOU uncomfortable.

The real truth: you want blacks to stop mentioning racism because it makes YOU uncomfortable. You detested Beyonce’s video because it made YOU uncomfortable. You had an issue with her performance paying homage to black struggles because it made YOU uncomfortable. And, that my friend is white superiority; to believe, anything that makes YOU uncomfortable must change. Never mind that other ethnicities have been uncomfortable for years.

Beyonce’s performance is being deemed inappropriate and an attack on the police, because a group of people missed the message; the group that always misses the true message. Not because they cannot possibly fathom it, but because they do not nor desire to understand anything that has nothing to do with them.

So, what’s your take on the Beyoncé’s half time performance? Do you agree that it was taken out of context? Do you side with the mayor that it was inappropriate?

Living in the moment,

Ebby


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REBLOG: Why Are We Celebrating This?

Here is a great video on the reason we celebrate Black History Month. Dr. Carter G. Woodson founded the month that was once just a week, “A visionary who believed history should be used as a source of motivation and a weapon against misinformation…”
Thank you, itsjazzysworld for sharing this!

It's Jazzy's World

Before I get too deep into February I just wanted to give you a brief history of black history month. I attend an HBCU and Black History Month is really highlighted here in almost every class. My teacher, a very eclectic, one-of-a-kind lady showed us this video in our Creative Writing Class.  I learned things I had never known and actually understood how Black History Month came to be. Hope you take a moment to watch this video and get a deeper understanding of Black History Month.

Before I get too deep into February I just wanted to give you a brief history of black history month. I attend an HBCU and Black History Month is really highlighted here in almost every class. My teacher, a very eclectic, one-of-a-kind lady showed us this video in our Creative Writing Class.  I learned things I had never known and actually understood how…

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It’s February: This Month on Ebby’s Lane

It’s February: What to Expect on Ebby’s Lane.

February is the month of love and one of my favorite subjects to study, Black History Month. You can expect post on dating and marriage (Kiss and Tell series), as well as Black history and culture (Do you know me series). I’m hoping to have some interesting Guest post for you as well! With that said, if you’re interested in being a guest blogger comment below and email @ ebbyslane@gmail.com with subject Guest Blogger Interests. Also, expect more creative writings tips & quotes. 

 

Living in the Moment,

Ebby Lane ♥


 

COMING SOON

March Series –International Women’s Month (Seeking guest bloggers of diverse culture to write a post about their life & culture.)

April – Creative Writing & Author spotlight ( Seeking Guest bloggers with tips on writing and seeking authors I can interview.