The Day We Finalized Our Adoption

The Day We Finalized Our Adoption


This is our little family standing outside the courtroom where we finalized the adoption of our son. It is one of the best moments of our lives.

I remember the moment I first heard about him and how my heart immediately loved him. I couldn’t wait to meet this baby that would change our world. 💙

💙My son, you are my heartbeat and I’m so thankful that God chose me to be your mommy.

As my sweet friend, Ginger calls it, “Happy Gotcha Day” ☺️💙

Discover Your Writer’s Voice

I attended a writer’s workshop, and it altered the way I see myself as a writer when it comes voice. Don’t you love when that happens? I had the opportunity to sit under Professor Balcarcel, who reminded writers how complicated and elusive it is to find your unique voice. What makes it complicated and elusive is there isn’t a clear, concrete definition of what voice is. So, if we cannot narrow it down to a condensed explanation, how do we learn to do it? Well, there is hope. Professor Balcarcel explained how certain aspects of voice assist us in discovering our own. First, let’s explore what voice is not.

Voice is not taking another author’s style and attempting to make it your own.

I am guilty of this. She reminded us voice has nothing to do with how you can break or butcher the rules of grammar and sentence structure. Guilty as charged. Professor Barcarcel did provide focus on the genetic makeup of voice.

First, your unique makeup is key to finding your voice.

In other words, your values, your beliefs, your goals are fingerprints to your voice. This uniqueness happens when you focus on yourself, your values, your goals, your character traits. If you are a spiritual person, there should be aspects of your writing that reflect such.

Secondly, she attempts to define voice as this, “your voice is the combinations of words and word choices you bring that no one else would think of.”

For the scholarly writers, syntax and diction are what creates voice. It means staying away from clique sentence stems and generic language we often see in writing. For example, “she stared with troubles eyes” or “he raised a brow,” or “her lips curled into a smirk.”She recommended incorporating traits in your writing which reflect what you are aspiring to. For me, that means creativity in word choice. I want to be bold when it comes to diction. If that means making a fool of myself sometimes, so be it. In addition, I aspire to add the trait of not giving a damn… not caring in my writing. I’m still working on that.

Lastly, your voice cannot be duplicated, and you must step out of your comfort zone to discover it.

You create your character’s voice the same way. You incorporate their background, their genetic makeup, their age, etc. It takes practice to find your voice and that of your characters.

To find your own voice, you have to go past imitations

Professor Balcarcel asked us to describe the night sky using the voice of a child. Here is mine.
“It is a big black thing with a whole bunch of little nightlights, and it has real big nightlight too. How come its so dark with so many nightlights?
Then, describe the night sky using the voice of an artist.
“There it is, blanketing my happiness with dark. Still, specs of it seep through, painting my life like a canvas.”

Lastly, describe the night sky using our own voice…
“It’s beautiful, comforting and opposite of what I’ve been taught. I’m supposed to be scared of it. I’m expected to pull the covers over my head and think myself safe. Yet, I stare it down with a crescent smile. The stars, they remind me that I can still myself in darkness.

3

 

So, I challenge my fellow writers to discover your voice by stepping out of your comfort zone, ridding yourself of outer influences, and mediocre redundancies. Put your true self in your writing and make it original. Make it epic.
Start now, describe the sky using your own unique voice and post your entries below. Until next time….

Sincerely,

Ebby

Christian Writer: How Real is Too Real?

I’m often torn with how “real” to be, when it comes to writing. I’m not a cookie cutter Christian and I don’t want to pretend to be.

Christians make a huge mistake of pretending to be something we are not.

We are flawed, we make mistakes and sometimes, our actions do not match what we profess. Don’t get me wrong, I know some true Mother Teresas and Ms. Claras (War Room) out there, but they too, are flawed.

Like many, my past is not some wholesome Christian journey to freedom. So, when I write fiction, realistic fiction, I want to stay true to my reality and the reality of so many others. Yet, I struggle with knowing where to draw the line.

I’ve learned the main culprit of my struggle is worrying too much about what other people think.

My biggest pet peeve is being misunderstood and hearing incorrect perceptions of me. The thing is, as an introvert and more as writer that comes with the territory. Thankfully, my husband and a few close friends have mastered the art of not caring and remaining true to them regardless. I’m slowly learning from them.  More importantly, I’m reminding myself of the only opinion that matters. In everything I do, I strive to please God above all else.

Ralph Emerson once penned, “To be great is to be misunderstood.” You have to be you, wp-1463495330817.jpgand not worry or care too much if people get it. At the end of the day, you must know and remember Who and why you write.

Do you struggle with how real to be in your writing? Do you struggle with being misunderstood? What are some ways you handle it?

Ebby ♥


 

CONTACT EBBY
fbtwitter-iconlinkedin-logoPinterest
EMAIL: Ebbyslane@gmail.com 

Click image to join Mailing list for exclusive content, giveaways, novel releases & more
LogoBlackAndWhiteNoText
 

Copyright © 2016 Writers With Purpose Publishing & Ebby Leblanc
All Rights Reserved

Preparation DFWCON: The Pitch

 

First, I apologize. I’ve been M.I.A. lately. I’ve been preparing my manuscript for my pitch session at the upcoming DFW Writers Conference (DFWCON). In addition, I’m practicing my pitch and writing my query letter. Today, I’d like to share with you a few sites that have help me with, THE PITCH, which could easily be mistaken for another word. HA! Recently, I attended Writers Bloc luncheon and had the pleasure to hear, Rosemary Clement speak. She offers some tips on her site. In addition, I found these helpful sites. Feel free to add tips and/or site recommendations in the comments below. In addition, if you are attending the conference, comment below or email me at Ebbyslane@gmail.com. Perhaps, we can practice our pitch together.

 The Pitch Sites

PDF Download of tips for the The Pitch

The Perfect Pitch

How to Pitch

7 Tips for Pitching

EBBY ♥

* Tomorrow I’ll share tips on writing the query letter. Join mailing list to have it sent to your email instead. LogoBlackAndWhiteNoText

 

 


CONTACT EBBY

fbtwitter-iconlinkedin-logoPinterest

EMAIL: Ebbyslane@gmail.com


Join Mailing list for exclusive content, giveaways, novel releases & more

Click the image to sign up now

LogoBlackAndWhiteNoText


Copyright © 2016 Writers With Purpose Publishing & Ebby Leblanc

All Rights Reserved